Discipline Doesn’t Stop When You’re on Sabbatical

When you think of the word discipline, you may get flashbacks. These flashbacks could be of a coach who treated your team more like a military unit than a sports group.

You may associate the word discipline with strict parents and a regimented childhood.

Discipline might make you think of an authoritarian regime.

I’m not talking about that kind of discipline.

Self discipline is your ally. It is not your enemy.

Discipline is doing the hard thing you know you should do but don’t want to do.

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Self discipline comes from within. It’s not something anyone imposes on you. No one is telling you what to do. No one is forcing you to do anything. You set your own pace.

With Seventh Week Sabbaticals, people often say, “Oh, that’s great you take so much time off! You may get less work done, but work isn’t everything.”

They miss the point. We get MORE done because we take Seventh Week Sabbaticals. Why?

We get seven weeks worth of work done in six weeks.

How is this possible? Because things take as long as the amount of time you give them.

Not only do we get the same seven weeks worth of work done as everyone else (in less time), but we also come back from sabbatical CHARGED UP. Because we’ve rested, we return to work with energy and enthusiasm.

There is a spike in productivity when we return from sabbatical because we’re amped up and ready to go. We’re looking forward to getting back to work.

As a result, we actually get more work done than people who don’t take Seventh Week Sabbaticals!

But seven weeks worth of work doesn’t get done in six weeks without discipline.

Discipline is what enables us to perform at a high level.

It’s not about the number of hours you work but how productive you are when you do.

We don’t have to work overtime to get seven weeks worth of work done in six weeks. We just have to stay disciplined when we do work. That means:

  • Minimize distractions.
  • Prevent the possibility of interruptions.
  • Prioritize and protect focus like your life depends on it.

Discipline frees you up to rest guilt-free on sabbatical.

Discipline is your friend.

In Maintaining Routine Through Sabbatical, I talk about how I keep my early morning schedule and continue to exercise throughout my sabbatical.

I treated my first couple dozen sabbatical weeks like lazy vacations. I’d stay up late, sleep in, and just sort of veg out. Sometimes I would do productive things, but mostly I just let the time slip away from me.

The week would go by in a blink and my sabbatical would be over.

In more recent years, I’ve made a point to stick to routine during sabbaticals. In other words, discipline does not stop.

Staying disciplined during the sabbatical does not mean I have no freedom. In fact, the exact opposite is true: I have more freedom than ever.

When I wake up early and maintain my early morning routine, exercise, and writing, I feel good about myself. In the first few hours, I’ve already done so much. Then, I have the rest of the day to do whatever I want! Nothing feels more restful. It’s a fulfilling kind of rest, as opposed to the lazy kind of rest I was practicing before. The lazy sabbaticals where I slacked around did not feel like true rest. They left me feeling unproductive, unfulfilled, and guilty.

When I stay disciplined on sabbatical, the week feels longer. I have more time in a day. I have more time to do nothing if that’s what I want to do! But I maintain a structure that creates this freedom. I can then use the freedom to rest, create, think, or do anything I want.

Discipline doesn’t stop when you’re on sabbatical—and that’s a good thing.